welcome to the cork house < official showroom of the jelinek cork group > tradition and innovation since 1855 

welcome to the cork house < official showroom of the jelinek cork group > tradition and innovation since 1855 

Week 13: Going Green with Recycled Cork

July 29, 2017

Week 13: Going Green with Recycled Cork

Hello readers, thanks for stopping by to check out the blog! This week I learned a lot more about the cork recycling process and why reusing cork can be a huge benefit to our world and the environment.

Cork is one of the most sustainable products due to its excellent harvesting process, with no trees being cut down. The cork we know and love comes from the bark of the tree and is harvested by hand every 9 years. In fact, the process of harvesting is healthy for the tree and doing so regularly can extend the tree's lifespan to over 300 years! What also amazed me about the cork tree is the fact that carbon dioxide is absorbed and locked away in the bark, and after every harvest, the bark grows back and continues to absorb more of the harmful gas.

Each and every natural cork product from the bark retains that carbon dioxide, so when it is burned or decomposed, it releases that stored gas and contributes to global warming. That’s why recycling or reusing cork is so important, because the longer the lifespan of a cork product, the longer it will keep CO2 out of our atmosphere. With over 12 billion cork wine stoppers being produced worldwide every year, this could make a huge difference!

The process of recycling cork is actually quite simple. It is ground down and treated until it’s reduced to a granule which can be used as a raw material again. To keep the cork stopper industry thriving, recycled cork isn’t used to make stoppers, but instead it goes towards a huge variety of old and new industries and uses. You can find recycled cork in anything from coverings, insulation, tennis balls, aircraft and car components, and of course flooring, fashion and household items.

Since cork is so durable, it's also a great material for your own DIY projects or crafts. Although, if you’d rather not hang on to your cork, they are recycling programs widely available. The Cork House in Oakville is home to one of the many CorkReHarvest drop boxes where rest assured your cork won’t end up in a landfill and will be put to good use in the future.  

I hope you learned something new this week as I did, and your love for cork and the cork industry has grown as well. Make sure to check back next week where I’ll have my final design for the Savannah Jelinek Cork Group location’s own coasters. See you next time!





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